Book Review: “Famine In The Land” (Stephen Lawson)

lawson_famine_in_the_land__53510__69691_zoomDr. Stephen J. Lawson serves as the Senior Pastor at Christ Fellowship Baptist Church in Mobile, Alabama. He has pastored churches in the states of Arkansas and Alabama for over 29 years. Lawson has received degrees from Texas Tech University (B.B.A.), Dallas Theological Seminary (Th.M.), and Reformed Theological Seminary (D.Min.). He is the author of 15 books including The Unwavering Resolve of Jonathan Edwards, Faith Under Fire, and Made In Our Image. Dr. Lawson is married to Anne and they have three sons, Andrew, James, and John, and a daughter, Grace Anne.

Purpose of the Book

Lawson wrote, “Famine in the Land directly addresses what, I believe, is the crying need of the hour, specifically that the modern-day pulpit be restored to her former glory of generations past, days when God’s truth was fearlessly proclaimed – days when doctrinal clarity, theological precision, and heart-searching application once poured forth from pulpits.” His desire is to encourage pastors to recover expository preaching so that their congregations can be fed the Word of God.

Organization and Content

This book is divided into four primary chapters that address (1) the priority of biblical preaching, (2) the power of biblical preaching, (3) the pattern of biblical preaching, (4) and the passion of biblical preaching. Lawson weaves in a tremendous amount of exposition as he works through each of these topics.

In the first chapter, Lawson examines the priority of biblical preaching that is found in the early church. He wrote, “With many ministries forsaking a steady diet of biblical exposition, where is an effective model to be found in which preaching and teaching God’s Word is the main entrée? What does it look like when a church is being served the meat of God’s Word? One need look no further that to the first church in Jerusalem, born on the Day of Pentecost and firmly planted in the soil of newly converted hearts.” The early church witnessed leaders who viewed dividing the Word of God as a solemn and great responsibility. This resulted in an explosion of growth in the early church and a people who were devoted to the Word of God. Lawson stated that the church must recover this vision for biblical preaching if it desires to make an impact in the world today.

In the second chapter, Lawson focuses on the need for biblical preaching that is courageous and compelling. He stated, “The crying need of the hour is for divine power to be restored to evangelical pulpits.” Lawson emphasized that this will only happen when God-called men boldly proclaim the Scriptures through the power of the Holy Spirit. He highlighted the preaching ministry of Jonah in this chapter and focused on Jonah’s courageous, compelling, confrontational, and compassionate preaching. This is a model for preaching in the contemporary church and needs to be recovered.

In the third chapter, Lawson emphasized the need for preachers to expound the Word of God. The Bible must be the central focus of the sermon regardless of the latest fad in contemporary preaching. He used Ezra as the biblical example and wrote, “All biblical preachers and teachers would do well to follow this pattern of Ezra’s ministry, which involved knowing (“study”), being (“practice”), and doing (“proclaiming”).” Ezra was a devoted student of Scripture, obedient to what the Scriptures taught, and diligent to preach it’s truth to others. These characteristics should also be true of contemporary preachers.

In the final chapter, Lawson discussed the need for passionate preaching in the church today. He wrote, “Passionate, biblical preaching from God-dominated men must be restored to the pulpit.” Lawson emphasized this point by looking at the charge Paul gave to Timothy in 1 and 2 Timothy. Paul exhorted Timothy to be passionate about the preaching ministry because if he was faithful to proclaim the Scriptures, people’s lives would be changed. Lawson closed by encouraging preachers to emulate the life of George Whitefield. He wrote, “May the holy flame of each God-called preacher burn brightly in this dark hour, faithful to the end.” This is a tireless call but one that preachers must pursue with every ounce of their being until the end of their lives.

 Personal Evaluation

One of the greatest accomplishments of this book is that Lawson is able to communicate a great amount of truth in such a short book. He also uses a tremendous amount of Scripture to support each and every claim he makes throughout the book. This is beneficial because it demonstrates to his reader exactly what he is writing about. It is clear that Lawson has a passion for God’s Word and for preachers to faithfully proclaim it to their people.

The greatest weakness of this book is that it is more descriptive rather than prescriptive in nature. While Lawson calls for a return of expository preaching in the contemporary church, he never really shows how to accomplish this. It would have been extremely helpful if he could have walked through some of the steps that must be taken for this to happen. I believe this would have allowed him to address the great need for expository preaching in the church and then provide a solution to restore its practice.

This book, overall, is a great work for expositors. Those who desire to preach expositional sermons will find it to be a great source of encouragement. Lawson pushes all the right buttons to cause preachers to take serious inventory of their life and ministry. His passion is contagious and reflects his love of God’s Word and God’s glory.

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